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PRESERVING THE ITEMS THAT WITNESSED HISTORY

Improvised Armored Vehicle Majsan

Improvised Armored Vehicle Majsan

APC Majsan was an improvised armored vehicle used by the Croatian police force in Dubrovnik during the Croatian War for Independence (Croatian Homeland War – Domovinski rat). Defenders of Dubrovnik were poorly armed, and lacking basic resources and vehicles, therefore they had to turn to Insurgency weapons and tactics.

 

The siege of Dubrovnik, a Croatian town on the Adriatic coast, begun on the 1st of October 1991. The town was completely surrounded by Yugoslav People’s Army forces, and the defenders were left with scarce weapons and supplies. In order to alleviate the lack of military equipment, at the beginning of the Homeland War, a significant number of improvised and small-series armored vehicles were produced in Croatian factories, workshops, and shipyards, mainly on the chassis of trucks and construction machinery.

 

Improvised armored vehicle Majsan was the only APC that was operational in the Dubrovnik town area during the initial phase of the war. It was built in Inkobrod shipyard on the island of Korčula in late October 1991 before being shipped to Dubrovnik. Yugoslav-made truck, TAM – 260 T26, was used for the chassis of this vehicle and the tires were filled with silicone to prevent the enemy from knocking it off. The vehicle saw extensive use during combat, by the defenders of Dubrovnik, seeing use in transport and evacuation of civilians and military personnel from scenes of heavy fighting. It was mainly driven during the night, on the relation Dubrovnik-Mokošica. During the day, Majsan was used for distributing food and supplies around Dubrovnik, specifically to the Dubrovnik defenders in Hotel Belvedere, one of the key strategic defensive points. Majsan could transport thirty armed soldiers, or around fifty civilians at a time, making it essential for the prevention of humanitarian crisis. The vehicle suffered heavy enemy fire throughout the war, but it was never destroyed or seriously damaged. It was in everyday operative use until the end of the Siege of Dubrovnik in May 1992 and used sporadically until the end of the war.


Nowadays, Majsan is displayed as a War memorial in the Dubrovnik city center, and it represents one of the symbols of the Croatian Homeland War.


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